Catchy phrases dating headlines


11-Dec-2017 20:38

For instance, “How did you learn to play the piano? Perhaps the users feel that it is a word that is least likely to offend people, but I consider it to be imprecise language that, over time, dumbs down the art of effective discourse.” – Richard Fry, Marathon, Ont. Contrast things that are self-evidently taken to be problematic with, say, actual problems like a hole in the ozone layer or a job loss.” – Adam Rosen, Asheville, N. “Often used with ‘engagement.’ If someone is disengaged, they’re not really a stakeholder in the first place.” Answer: “So my dad was in a classical music club…” – Bob Forrest, Tempe Ariz. The word serves no purpose in the sentence and to me is like fingernails on a chalkboard. LSSU, please engage your stakeholders by adding this pretentious jargon to your list. Harley Carter of Calgary, Alberta, says he has heard it with another word popular in business-speak, “socialize,” which means to spread an idea around to see what others think of it.Post-Truth – To paraphrase the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, we are entitled to our own opinions but not to our own facts. What’s considered as such is best left to historians rather than the contemporary media. Golf greens are the closest grass comes to being manicured. Needs to return to its genesis: perfectly groomed eyebrows. Ghost – To abruptly end communication, especially on social media.Guesstimate – When : 8 letters, 3 words, 1 meaning. Bigly – Did the candidate say “big league” or utter this 19th-Century word that means, ? Is it rejection angst, or is this word really as overused as word-banishment nominators contend? Dadbod – The flabby opposite of a chiseled-body male ideal. ” – The Committee is not sure why this malapropism got nominators’ dander up in 2016.Tons – Refers to an exaggerated quantity, as in tons of sunshine or tons of work. Dish – As in to dish out the latest rumor on someone.

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– Beth, Anchorage, Alaska “I am not sure who is responsible, but over the last 12-18 months you cannot watch a sporting event, listen to a sports talk show on radio, or anything on ESPN without someone using this term to attempt to describe an athlete or a contest.” – Dan Beitzel, Perrysburg, Ohio “Every time I hear them say it, I change the channel.” – Brenda Ruffing, Jackson, Mich. News flash: We ALL like food.” – Graydeon De Camp, Elk Rapids, Mich. “It used to have a special significance reserved mainly for fine art and museums. Monthly food and clothing subscription boxes claim to be finely ‘curated.’ Instead of abusing curated, why don’t they say what they really mean: ‘We did an online search and posted the first 25 items we found’ or the ‘curated selection of items in your box this month are a mix of paid placements and products that have failed to sell elsewhere.'” – Samantha Mc Cormick, Kirkland, Wash. I’ve heard Charlie Rose use it, as well as countless numbers of news talking heads, usually for all the wrong reasons. Nobody cares about you.” — David, Lake Mills, Wisc. This common way of describing an automobile collision has now made it from conversation into the news reports.